Re: RARA-AVIS: Re: western vs noir, cowboy vs private eye

From: Joy Matkowski (jmatkowski1@comcast.net)
Date: 06 Jul 2009

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    Thanks, Jim, for M. Fagyas's The Fifth Woman, which sounds like the book I've been remembering and looking for, without remembering the author or the title, for decades. And some of the others behind the Iron Curtain I haven't read look worthwhile, too.
        But I think I'll skip the cowboys. Joy //

    JIM DOHERTY wrote:
    > Bengt,
    >
    > Re your post below:
    >
    > "So Im thinking about the connection between the two - or the one -
    > genre(s), between american crime novels and the myth of the american western and cowboy myth. Has there been anything written about this? Am I right? You have any thoughts that can send me in the right direction when I start writing? Any suggestion of other american crime writers who come close to western cowboy novels - or writers of cowboy fiction who come close to crime novels? Or anything!"
    >
    > In a recent edition of my "I LIke 'Em Tough" column for MYSTERICAL-E, on the occasion of Elmore Leonard's winning a Lifetime Achievement Award from Western Writers of America, I wrote a column on just that subject, called "The Hard-B(O)i(L)e(D) West," that you might find useful. You can find it here:
    >
    > http://www.mystericale.com/index.php?issue=091&body=file&file=like_em_tough.htm
    >
    > Apropos of nothing to do with this thread, the latest edition of my ILET column, "Iron Curtain Cops," can be found here:
    >
    > http://www.mystericale.com/index.php?issue=current_issue&body=file&file=like_em_tough.htm
    >
    > As its title suggests, it's about police procedurals set in the USSR and other Soviet Bloc countries.
    >
    >

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